Wetheral

Ancient parish in Cumberland ward, Cumberland,Edit comprising four townships: Wetheral, Scotby, Cumwhinton & Cotehill, and Warwick Bridge & Great Corby (each treated separately below). CP enlarged by absorbing Warwick CP 1934. Part of CP transferred to Carlisle 1951.

Acreage:

parish covered 11,489 acres [4,731 ha].


Population:

estimated at 515 in 1688; rising from 1,697 in 1801 to 3,165 by 1851, then fairly stable to stand at 3,324 in 1931 (last census year before boundary changes). For population of individual townships in earlier 19th century, see below.



WETHERAL:

4,478 acres [1,812 ha], including detached portion of 2,313 acres [936 ha], largely consisting of former moorland at southern extremity of parish. Commons enclosed under Inglewood Forest enclosure award 1819.


Population:

rising from 376 in 1801 to 666 in 1861.


Landownership:

core of endowment of Wetheral Priory, founded c.1100, passing after Dissolution to Dean and Chapter of Carlisle.


Economy:

farming; market gardening; shops and services in village.


Places of worship:

medieval parish church of Holy Trinity; tower added 1790 (restored 1882); chancel rebuilt 1872. Wesleyan Methodist chapel built 1873; still in use.


Schools and other institutions:

school endowed 1760; rebuilt 1854; had closed by 1978 when buildings taken over for play school. Ladies’ boarding school established at Lime House c.1856; became boys’ preparatory school 1899; moved to Hawkesdale (see Dalston) 1946. Working men’s reading and recreation room built 1891; became village hall; sold 2013 and replaced by new Wetheral Village and Community Hall.



SCOTBY:

1,681 acres [680 ha]. Common fields at Scotby Holme (144 acres [59 ha]) and Holme Gate enclosed 1777 and 1788


Population:

rising from 275 in 1801 to 520 in 1861.


Landownership:

part of honour of Penrith (q.v.), with which it descended.


Economy:

farming; market gardening; tanneries established by Elihu Sutton 1781; closed 1930.


Places of worship:

Quaker meeting house built 1718; closed 1913. All Saints’ church (Anglican) built 1854.


Schools and other institutions:

school recorded 1814; endowed parochial school built 1853-4; replaced by modern building 1963; now Scotby CE Primary School. Parish workhouse for Warwick and Wetheral parishes at Wheelbarrow Hall, Holme Lane, late 18th century. Newsroom and library built by mid-19th century; said to have been one of earliest working men’s reading rooms in northern England. Welcome Institute converted from inn 1917; rebuilt as village hall 1926; extended 1953.



CUMWHINTON & COTEHILL:

2,570 acres [1,040 ha]. Common field at Cotehill (115 acres [47 ha]) enclosed 1840. Commons in Cumwhinton enclosed under Inglewood Forest enclosure award 1819.


Population:

rising from 365 in 1801 to 633 in 1861.


Landownership:

lordship of manor divided at an early date: by late 19th century half belonged to Armathwaite Castle Estate and half to Aglionby family.


Economy:

Cumwhinton noted for rich corn grounds in later 17th century. Brick and tile works in mid-19th century. Gypsum quarrying, recorded from 1695; major expansion with alabaster works at Knott Hill and Cocklakes from 1873 to 1920s.


Places of worship:

school used as chapel before church of St John the Evangelist, Cotehill, built 1868. Wesleyan Association chapel at Cumwhinton built 1816; replaced by adjacent Free Methodist chapel 1904; closed 1965. Wesleyan Methodist chapel at Cotehill by 1900; demolished for road widening 1930s; new chapel opened 1937; still in use. Mission hall at Cumwhinton built 1908; now village hall.


Schools and other institutions:

endowed school at Cumwhinton built 1839; rebuilt on new site 1895; now Cumwhinton Primary School. National school at Cotehill built 1852; open in late 20th century; now closed. Private boarding school at Englethwaite Hall in 1901. Village halls at Cotehill (1930) and Cumwhinton (former mission hall).



WARWICK BRIDGE & GREAT CORBY:

2,760 acres [1,117 ha].


Population:

rising from 561 in 1801 to 1,180 in 1851.


Landownership:

manor of Corby granted to Richard Salkeld 1337 after attainder of Sir Andrew de Harcla, earl of Carlisle; descended through Salkeld family until divided between two heiresses in later 15th century. Sir William Howard of Naworth acquired both halves 1605 and 1625 and gave Corby to his second son, Sir Francis Howard, in whose family it remained until later 20th century.


Economy:

salmon fishery in River Eden since medieval period (with coops at Corby Castle). Ferry across River Eden at Corby, recorded 1688. Textile industry suggested by name Walk Mill (later Glencairn Mill); site was cotton mill in 1861. Cotton spinning mill and dye works at Warwick Bridge, established 1790-3; closed c.1977. Paper manufacture at Allenwood mill from mid-19th century to early 20th. Woollen mill at Broadwath from later 19th century; disused by 1962. Broadwath estate divided into Land Settlement Association smallholdings 1930s.


Places of worship:

Roman Catholic church of Our Lady and St Wilfred at Warwick Bridge built 1840-1. Anglican church of St Paul, near Warwick Bridge, built 1845-6. Primitive Methodist chapels at Great Corby (built 1889; closed 1980s) and Warwick Bridge (built c.1907; closed).


Schools and other institutions:

school at Corby endowed 1720; rebuilt 1845; extended 1882; now Great Corby Primary School. School at Warwick Bridge by early 20th century; now Warwick Bridge Primary School. School at Warwick Bridge cotton mill in mid-19th century. Reading room at Great Corby established 1850; rebuilt 1877; now village hall. Down-a-gate community centre, Warwick Bridge, built 1997


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